Author: BayesianBabies

PhD student at UC Berkeley in Developmental Psychology.

Data Science for Cog Sci Kids

Cognitive scientists think about how people think about data. Embedded in every cognitive science question is a data science question: What should you infer given some sort of data? Adjusting that answer with people’s quirks, biases, constraints, or what have you, we have a model of human learning. This makes

Appreciating fMRI studies for non-fMRI researchers, 3 tips from Nancy Kanwisher

As a non-fMRI researcher who consumes fMRI studies from time to time, I’ve wondered how one can spot loose or even audacious claims relying on basic logic and scientific thinking. In one of her “brain talks”, Nancy Kanwisher warned readers against three common issues in fMRI studies that they should

Thoughts on Qualifying Exam

A week ago today I passed my Qualifying Exam. It felt surreal: it seemed only yesterday that I came across blog posts here and there about the grilling quals at Berkeley, but that was over two years ago when I was still an undergrad! Looking back, I truly appreciate this experience–like everyone

Qualifying Exam Reading List

Here’s a PDF version of my reading list and proposed questions. Topic #1 Active Learning Instead of trying to produce a programme to simulate the adult mind, why not rather try to produce one which simulates the child’s? — Alan M. Turing, Computing Machinery and Intelligence (1950) Introduction Imagine, to train

Should you go to grad school?

When I was interviewing for grad school two years ago,  a professor asked what I wanted to do after grad school. I said I wanted to be a professor. Doesn’t everyone? To my surprise, he said that should never be my only reason to go to grad school. He explained,

Sampling biases in developmental studies

Are parents who agree to let their children participate in scientific experiments really a representative sample of all human parents? At some point, perhaps developmental researchers all have wondered, are parents who agree to let their children participate in scientific experiments really a representative sample of all human parents? Anecdotally,

Beginner’s CoCoSci list

I’ll come back to add comments on why I think these books, websites, lists, etc. are amazing when I get the chance. Also, I’ll keep updating as I know or think of more. Theory Probability Theory: The Logic of Science (E. T. Jaynes, 2003) Above is THE book that sets

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